1 February 1971

McDonnell Douglas F-4E-44-MC Phantom II 69-7294 retracting its landing gear after takeoff from Lambert-St. Louis International Airport, St. Louis, Missouri. (McDonnell Douglas)
McDonnell Douglas F-4E-44-MC Phantom II 69-7294 retracting its landing gear after takeoff from Lambert-St. Louis International Airport, St. Louis, Missouri. (McDonnell Douglas)

1 February 1971: The 4,000th McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II, F-4E-44-MC serial number 69-7294, was delivered to the United States Air Force.

McDonnell Douglas F-4E Phantom II 69-7294. Eglin AFB, 2 June 1971. (aircraftslides.com)

In 1989, 69-7294 was converted to the F-4G Wild Weasel V configuration. The Wild Weasel was an aircraft equipped to attack surface-to-air missile sites and targeting radars, using a variety of high-speed radar-homing missiles. The F-4G had its M-61 Vulcan rotary cannon removed and replaced with a radar homing and warning radar, as well as improvements to the rear cockpit for management of electronic warfare systems. 134 F-4E Phantom II fighters were converted to F-4G Wild Weasels.

McDonnell Douglas F-4G Wild Weasel 69-7263, a converted F-4E Phantom II, over the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. (U.S. Air Force)
McDonnell Douglas F-4G Advanced Wild Weasel 69-7263, a modified F-4E-44-MC Phantom II, over the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. It is carrying a variety of ground-attack missiles on its underwing hardpoints. On the left wing, closest to the camera is an AGM-88 HARM, and inboard, an AGM-65 Maverick. Under the fuselage is an ALQ-119 Electronic Counter Measures (ECM) pod. Under the right wing is an AGM-78 Standard ARM, and then an AGM-45 Shrike. The Phantom is painted in the European I camouflage pattern. This airplane is on display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force)
mcDonnell Douglas F-4G-44-MC Phantom II. (Photograph courtesy of Marc Portengen)
McDonnell Douglas F-4G Wild Weasel V 69-7294, the 4,000th Phantom II, painted in a two-tone high- and low-reflectance gray camouflage pattern, assigned to the 190th Fighter Squadron, Idaho Air National Guard. (Photograph courtesy of Marc Portengen)

69-7294 served with the U.S. Air Force 90th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 3rd Tactical Fighter Wing at Clark Air Base in the Philippines and in Southwest Asia during the Gulf War as part of the “Philippine Expeditionary Force” and later in Operation Southern Watch with the 190th Fighter Squadron, Idaho Air National Guard. After twenty-five years, 7294 was retired to The Boneyard at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Tucson, Arizona in 1996.

Left rear quarter view of McDonnell Douglas F-4G-44-MC Phantom II 69-7294. (Photograph courtesy of Bas Stubert)
Left rear quarter view of McDonnell Douglas F-4G Wild Weasel V 69-7294, the 4,000th Phantom II. (Photograph courtesy of Bas Stubert)

The Wild Weasel was next converted to a QF-4G drone. Removed from long term storage and returned to airworthy condition by the Aircraft Maintenance and Regeneration Center, 7294 was flown to Mojave Airport, California, where the drone conversion was completed by Tracor, Inc. Launched from Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, 69-7294 was “expended” as a remote-controlled aerial target, 4 November 1998.

The 4,000th Phantom II, now a QF-4G drone, 69-7294 taxxis at Dobbins Air Force Base, Georgia, 30 September 1998, just a few weeks before it was destroyed as an aerial target. (Copyrighted photograph courtesy of Frank J. Mirande)
The 4,000th Phantom II, now a QF-4G drone, 69-7294 taxis at Dobbins Air Force Base, Georgia, 30 September 1998, just a few weeks before it was destroyed as an aerial target. (Photograph courtesy of Frank J. Mirande)

© 2018, Bryan R. Swopes

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6 thoughts on “1 February 1971

  1. In the first photo, what types of drop tanks is the aircraft flying with? I’m trying to model this one. I know what the wing tanks are, but the two smaller tanks under the fuselage is more of a mystery.

    1. Andrew, the centerline station should be a 600-gallon fuel tank. I believe that the item on the inboard station of the left wing is a travel pod (MXU-648???) I read somewhere that the F-4G carried an F-15 centerline tank.

  2. Bryan,

    Thank you so much for that! That’s exactly what it is. Apparently it’s just an empty BLU-27 without fins and an added door. It will be a couple of months, but I’d love to send you the completed photos of this model when I’m finished. 🙂 Thank you again for this wonderful webpage and piece of history.

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