Tag Archives: Target Drone

11 September 1953

A Grumman F6F-5K Hellcat drone awaits its fate on “death row” at Armitage Field, NOTS China Lake, California. (U.S. Navy)

11 September 1953: At Naval Ordinance Test Station China Lake, the experimental Philco/General Electric XAAM-N-7 “Sidewinder” heat-seeking air-to-air missile scored its first “hit” when it passed within 2 feet (0.6 meters) of a radio-controlled Grumman F6F-5K Hellcat. The missile was fired from a Douglas AD-4 Skyraider flown by Lieutenant Commander Albert Samuel Yesensky, United States Navy, the Officer-in-Charge (OIC) of Guided Missile Unit SIXTY-ONE (GMU-61).

XAAM-N-7 Sidewinder mounted under the right wing of Douglas AD-4 Skyraider Bu. No. 123920 (U.S. Navy)
XAAM-N-7 Sidewinder mounted under the right wing of Douglas AD-4 Skyraider Bu. No. 123920 (U.S. Navy)

The Sidewinder was later redesignated AIM-9. It entered service in 1956 as the AIM-9B and has been a primary fighter weapon for 60 years.

A Raytheon XAAM-N-7 Sidewinder I missile mounted under the left wing of a Douglas AD-4 Skyraider, Bu. No. 123920, circa 1952. (U.S. Navy)
This black-and-white photograph of a Philco/General Electric Sidewinder I missile shows better detail. It is mounted under the left wing of Douglas AD-4 Skyraider, Bu. No. 123920, circa 1952. (U.S. Navy)

The AIM-9 Sidewinder is a Mach 2.5+ missile, equipped with an infrared seeker to track the heat signature of the target aircraft. (The Hellcat drones used in the early test had flares mounted on the wingtips to give the experimental missile a target).

The current production version, AIM-9X Block II, is produced by Raytheon Missile Systems, Tucson, Arizona. It is 9 feet, 11 inches long (3.023 meters), 5 inches in diameter (12.70 centimeters), and weighs 188 pounds (85 kilograms). The warhead weighs 20.8 pounds (9.4 kilograms). The missile’s range and speed are classified. At current production levels, the average cost of each AIM-9X is $420,944 (FY 2015 cost). Block III development was cancelled for FY 2106.

Future Astronaut Wally Schirra flew many of the early test flights at NOTS China Lake. On one occasion, a Sidewinder came back at him, and only by skill and luck was he able to evade it.

This sequence shows the effects of a hit on an F6F-5K drone by an experimental XAAM-N-7 Sidewinder missile. (U.S. Navy)
This sequence shows the effects of a hit on an F6F-5K drone by an experimental XAAM-N-7 Sidewinder missile. (U.S. Navy)

NOTC China Lake is now designated as Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAWCWD) China Lake. It is located approximately 55 miles (88 kilometers) north-northeast of Edwards Air Force Base in the high desert of Southern California.

© 2016, Bryan R. Swopes

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1 February 1971

McDonnell Douglas F-4E-44-MC Phantom II 69-7294 retracting its landing gear after takeoff from Lambert-St. Louis International Airport, St. Louis, Missouri. (McDonnell Douglas)
McDonnell Douglas F-4E-44-MC Phantom II 69-7294 retracting its landing gear after takeoff from Lambert-St. Louis International Airport, St. Louis, Missouri. (McDonnell Douglas)

1 February 1971: The 4,000th McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II, F-4E-44-MC serial number 69-7294, was delivered to the United States Air Force.

In 1989, 69-7294 was converted to the F-4G Wild Weasel V standard. The Wild Weasel was an aircraft configured to attack surface-to-air missile sites and targeting radars, using a variety of high-speed radar-homing missiles. The F-4G had its M-61 Vulcan rotary cannon removed and replaced with a radar homing and warning radar, as well as improvements to the rear cockpit for management of electronic warfare systems. 134 F-4E Phantom II fighters were converted to F-4G Wild Weasels.

McDonnell Douglas F-4G Wild Weasel 69-7263, a converted F-4E Phantom II, over the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. (U.S. Air Force)
McDonnell Douglas F-4G Advanced Wild Weasel 69-7263, a modified F-4E-44-MC Phantom II, over the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. It is carrying a variety of ground-attack missiles on its underwing hardpoints. On the left wing, closest to the camera is an AGM-88 HARM, and inboard, an AGM-65 Maverick. Under the fuselage is an ALQ-119 Electronic Counter Measures (ECM) pod. Under the right wing is an AGM-78 Standard ARM, and then an AGM-45 Shrike. The Phantom is painted in the European I camouflage pattern. This airplane is on display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force)
mcDonnell Douglas F-4G-44-MC Phantom II. (Photograph courtesy of Marc Portengen)
McDonnell Douglas F-4G Wild Weasel V 69-7294, the 4,000th Phantom II, painted in a two-tone high- and low-reflectance gray camouflage pattern, assigned to the 190th Fighter Squadron, Idaho Air National Guard. (Photograph courtesy of Marc Portengen)

69-7294 served with the U.S. Air Force 90th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 3rd Tactical Fighter Wing at Clark Air Base in the Philippines and in Southwest Asia during the Gulf War as part of the “Philippine Expeditionary Force” and later in Operation Southern Watch with the 190th Fighter Squadron, Idaho Air National Guard. After twenty-five years, 7294 was retired to The Boneyard at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Tucson, Arizona in 1996.

Left rear quarter view of McDonnell Douglas F-4G-44-MC Phantom II 69-7294. (Photograph courtesy of Bas Stubert)
Left rear quarter view of McDonnell Douglas F-4G Wild Weasel V 69-7294, the 4,000th Phantom II. (Photograph courtesy of Bas Stubert)

The Wild Weasel was next converted to a QF-4G drone. Removed from long term storage and returned to airworthy condition by the Aircraft Maintenance and Regeneration Center, 7294 was flown to Mojave Airport, California, where the drone conversion was completed by Tracor, Inc. Launched from Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, 69-7294 was “expended” as a remote-controlled aerial target, 4 November 1998.

The 4,000th Phantom II, now a QF-4G drone, 69-7294 taxxis at Dobbins Air Force Base, Georgia, 30 September 1998, just a few weeks before it was destroyed as an aerial target. (Copyrighted photograph courtesy of Frank J. Mirande)
The 4,000th Phantom II, now a QF-4G drone, 69-7294 taxis at Dobbins Air Force Base, Georgia, 30 September 1998, just a few weeks before it was destroyed as an aerial target. (Photograph courtesy of Frank J. Mirande)

© 2017, Bryan R. Swopes

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