Tag Archives: World Record for Speed Over a Closed Circuit of 1000 Kilometers With a 2000 Kilogram Payload

14 January 1962

Convair B-58A-10-CF Hustler 59-2441, Thompson Trophy winner. (U.S. Air Force)
Convair B-58A-10-CF Hustler 59-2441, Thompson Trophy winner. (U.S. Air Force)

14 January 1961: Lt. Col. Harold E. Confer, Lt. Col. Richard Weir and Major Howard Bialas, flying Convair B-58A-10-CF Hustler 59-2441, Roadrunner, obliterated the FAI closed-course speed records established only two days earlier by another B-58 crew flying 59-2442. They averaged 2,067.58 kilometers per hour (1,284.73 miles per hour) over a 1,000 kilometer closed circuit, more than 200 miles per hour faster, and set three Fédération Aéronautique Internationale records. They were awarded the Thompson Trophy.

59-2441 was sent to The Boneyard in 1970, and along with its sister, 59-2442, scrapped in 1977.

Colonel Harold E. Confer, U.S. Air Force
Colonel Harold E. Confer, U.S. Air Force

FAI Record File Num #4565 [Direct Link]
Status: ratified – retired by changes of the sporting code
Region: World
Class: C (Powered Aeroplanes)
Sub-Class: C-1 (Landplanes)
Category: Not applicable
Group: 3 : turbo-jet
Type of record: Speed over a closed circuit of 1 000 km without payload
Performance: 2 067.58 km/h
Date: 1961-01-14
Course/Location: Edwards AFB, CA (USA)
Claimant Harold E. Confer (USA)
Aeroplane: Convair B-58A Hustler (USAF 92-441)
Engines: 4 G E J79

FAI Record File Num #4566 [Direct Link]
Status: ratified – retired by changes of the sporting code
Region: World
Class: C (Powered Aeroplanes)
Sub-Class: C-1 (Landplanes)
Category: Not applicable
Group: 3 : turbo-jet
Type of record: Speed over a closed circuit of 1 000 km with 1 000 kg payload
Performance: 2 067.58 km/h
Date: 1961-01-14
Course/Location: Edwards AFB, CA (USA)
Claimant Harold E. Confer (USA)
Aeroplane: Convair B-58A Hustler (USAF 92-441)
Engines: 4 G E J79

FAI Record File Num #4567 [Direct Link]
Status: ratified – retired by changes of the sporting code
Region: World
Class: C (Powered Aeroplanes)
Sub-Class: C-1 (Landplanes)
Category: Not applicable
Group: 3 : turbo-jet
Type of record: Speed over a closed circuit of 1 000 km with 2 000 kg payload
Performance: 2 067.58 km/h
Date: 1961-01-14
Course/Location: Edwards AFB, CA (USA)
Claimant Harold E. Confer (USA)
Aeroplane: Convair B-58A Hustler (USAF 92-441)
Engines: 4 G E J79

Thompson Trophy at the Smithsonian Institution National Air and Space Museum. (NASM)
Thompson Trophy at the Smithsonian Institution National Air and Space Museum. (NASM)

The B-58 Hustler was a high-altitude Mach 2 strategic bomber which served with the United States Air Force from 1960 to 1970. It was crewed by a pilot, navigator/bombardier and a defensive systems operator located in individual cockpits. The aircraft is a delta-winged configuration similar to the Convair F-102A Delta Dagger and F-106 Delta Dart supersonic interceptors.

The Hustler is 96 feet, 10 inches (29.515 meters) long, with a wing span of 56 feet, 10 inches (17.323 meters) and an overall height of 31 feet 5 inches (9.576 meters). The wing’s leading edge is swept back at a 60° angle and the fuselage incorporates the “area rule” which resulted in a “wasp waist” or “Coke bottle” shape for a significant reduction in aerodynamic drag. The airplane’s only control surfaces are two “elevons” and a rudder, and there are no flaps. Four General Electric J79-GE-5 afterburning turbojet engines, producing 15,000 pounds of thrust, each, are suspended under the wings from pylons. The bomber had a cruise speed of 610 miles per hour (981.7 kilometers per hour) and a maximum speed of 1,325 miles per hour (2,132.4 kilometers per hour). The service ceiling is 64,800 feet (19,751 meters). Unrefueled range is 4,400 miles (7,081 kilometers). Maximum weight is 168,000 pounds (76,203.5 kilograms).

The B-58 weapons load was a combination of W-39,  B43 or B61 nuclear bombs. The weapons could be carried in a jettisonable centerline pod, which also carried fuel. The smaller bombs could be carried on underwing hardpoints. There was a defensive 20 mm M61 rotary cannon mounted in the tail, with 1,200 rounds of ammunition and controlled by the Defensive Systems Officer.

Convair B-58A-10-CF Hustler 59-2441, Thompson Trophy winner, at Davis-Monthan AFB. (U.S. Air Force)
Convair B-58A-10-CF Hustler 59-2441, Thompson Trophy winner, at Davis-Monthan AFB. (U.S. Air Force)

© 2016, Bryan R. Swopes

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24 March 1960

The prototype Tupolev Tu-114, CCCP-L5611, a long-range turboprop airliner, on display at the Monino Central Air Force Museum, Moscow. (Aldo Bidini)
Colonel Ivan Moiseevich Sukhomlin, Honored Test Pilot of the Soviet Union

24 March 1960: Over a 1,000-kilometer course at Sternberg Point Observatory,¹ a Tupolev Tu-114 Rossiya four-engine turboprop airliner, serial number 88402, registered CCCP-76459, set eight Fédération Aéronautique Internationale flight records, including a world speed record of 871.38 kilometers per hour (541.45 miles per hour), while carrying a load of 25,000 kilograms (55,115.6 pounds).²

The flight crew for these records were Tupolev Design Bureau senior test pilot Ivan Moiseevich Sukhomlin, Pilot, and Boris Mikhailovich Timoshok, Co-Pilot, and four others.

This is the fastest speed record ever established for any propeller-driven airplane, a record that has stood for 58 years.

Tupolev Tu-114 CCCP-76459, set eight world records, 24 March 1960. (Unattributed)

The record-setting Tu-114 was the second production airliner.

Colonel Alexei Petrovich Yakimov, Honored Test Pilot of the Soviet Union.

The Tupolev Tu-114 Rossiya was a four-engine, turboprop-powered airliner developed from the Tu-95 Bear nuclear-capable long-range heavy bomber. It had a flight crew of five and could be configured to carry from 120 to 220 passengers. The airliner made its first flight 15 November 1957 under the command of Colonel Alexei Petrovich Yakimov,  and began regular service with Aeroflot 24 April 1961.

The Tu-114 is 54.10 meters (177 feet, 6 inches) long, with a wingspan of 51.10 meters (167 feet, 8 inches) and overall height of 15.50 meters (50 feet, 10 inches). The wings are swept to a 35° angle and have significant anhedral. The airliner’s empty weight is 91,000 kilograms (200,621 pounds) and maximum takeoff weight is 171,000 kilograms (376,990 pounds).

The Tu-114 was powered by four Kuznetsov NK-12MV turboprop engines, each driving two counter-rotating four-bladed propellers. The NK-12 was rated at 14,795 shaft horsepower (10.89 megawwatts). The NK-12 is a single-shaft axial-flow turbpprop engine with a 14-stage compressor section and 5-stage turbine. The engine is 19 feet, 8.2 inches (6.000 meters) long, 3 feet, 11.3 inches (1.151 meters) in diameter, and weighs 5,181 pounds (2,350 kilograms).

The Tu-114 had a cruise speed of 770 kilometers per hour (478 miles per hour) at 9,000 meters (29,528 feet) (0.70 Mach), and a maximum speed of 870 kilometers per hour (541 miles per hour) at 8,000 meters (26,247 feet) (0.78 Mach).

A Tupolev Tu-114 at Paris-Le Bourget after a flight from Budapest, Hungary, 5 June 1959. (Magyar Hírek folyóirat/Wikipedia)

The Tupolev Tu-114 was produced from 1958 to 1963, with 32 built. They were in service until 1976.

CCCP-76459, the world-record-setting airliner, was displayed at Novogorod Airport, Veliky Novogorod, Russia, in 1977. It was destroyed by fire in 1990.

The world-record-setting Tupolev Tu-114, CCCP-76459 (s/n 88401), was destroyed by fire at Novogorod in 1990. (Detlev Grass via Авиация, понятная всем )

An interesting 10-minute 1959 color film about the prototype Tu-114 Rossiya can be viewed on YouTube:

¹ The Sternberg Point Observatory, also known as the Sternberg Astronomical Institute (Государственный астрономический институт имени Штернберга), is located in Moscow, Russia.

Sternberg Astronomical Institute

² FAI Record File Number 8125, World Record for Speed Over a Closed Circuit of 1000 Kilometers Without Payload: 871.38 kilometers per hour (541.45 miles per hour)

FAI Record File Number 8126, World Record for Speed Over a Closed Circuit of 1000 Kilometers With a 1000 Kilogram Payload: 871.38 kilometers per hour (541.45 miles per hour)

FAI Record File Number 8127, World Record for Speed Over a Closed Circuit of 1000 Kilometers With a 2000 Kilogram Payload: 871.38 kilometers per hour (541.45 miles per hour)

FAI Record File Number 8128, World Record for Speed Over a Closed Circuit of 1000 Kilometers With a 5000 Kilogram Payload: 871.38 kilometers per hour (541.45 miles per hour)

FAI Record File Number 8129, World Record for Speed Over a Closed Circuit of 1000 Kilometers With a 10000 Kilogram Payload: 871.38 kilometers per hour (541.45 miles per hour)

FAI Record File Number 8130, World Record for Speed Over a Closed Circuit of 1000 Kilometers With a 15000 Kilogram Payload: 871.38 kilometers per hour (541.45 miles per hour)

FAI Record File Number 8131, World Record for Speed Over a Closed Circuit of 1000 Kilometers With a 20000 Kilogram Payload: 871.38 kilometers per hour (541.45 miles per hour)

FAI Record File Number 8880, World Record for Speed Over a Closed Circuit of 1000 Kilometers With a 25000 Kilogram Payload: 871.38 kilometers per hour (541.45 miles per hour)

© 2018, Bryan R. Swopes

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