6 June 1944

An LCVP assigned to USS Samuel Chase disembarks soldiers of the 1st Infantry Division in front of Colleville-sur-Mer, Normandy, 6 June 1944. (CPHOM Robert F. Sargent, U.S. Coast Guard/United States Coast Guard 190415-G-G0000-7001)
Normandy
Normandy American Cemetery

These sons of America sacrificed everything to save the people of Europe.

Never forget.

American Military Cemetery near Colleville-sur-Mer, Normandy, France
Normandy American Cemetery, Colleville-sur-Mer, France. 9,387 American soldiers, buried. 1,557 missing in action. (Bjarki Sigursveinsson)
Brittany American Cemetery, Saint James, France. 4,409 American soldiers buried. 499 missing in action.
Brittany American Cemetery, Saint James, France. 4,409 American soldiers buried. 499 missing in action.
Epinal American Cemetery, Dinoze, France.
Epinal American Cemetery, Dinozé, France. 5,255 American soldiers buried. 424 missing in action.
Lorraine American Cemetery, Avenue de Fayetteville, St. Avold, France. 10,489 American soldiers.
Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France. 10,489 American soldiers buried. 444 missing in action.
Rhone American Cemetery, Draguignan, France. 860 American soldiers buried. 294 missing in action.
Rhone American Cemetery, Draguignan, France. 860 American soldiers buried. 294 missing in action.
Ardennes American Cemetery, Neupre, Belgium. 5,323 American soldiers buried. 463 missing in action.
Ardennes American Cemetery, Neupre, Belgium. 5,323 American soldiers buried. 463 missing in action.
Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Hombourg, Belgium. 7,992 American soldiers buried. 450 missing in action.
Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Hombourg, Belgium. 7,992 American soldiers buried. 450 missing in action.
Forence American Cemetery, Impruneta, Italy. 4,402 burials. 1,409 missing in action.
Florence American Cemetery, Impruneta, Italy. 4,402 American soldiers buried. 1,409 missing in action.
Luxembourg American Cemetery, Val du Scheid, Luxembourg. 5,076 American soldiers buried. 371 missing in action.
Luxembourg American Cemetery, Val du Scheid, Luxembourg. 5,076 American soldiers buried. 371 missing in action.
Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands. 8,301 American soldiers buried. 1,722 missing in action,
Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands. 8,301 American soldiers buried. 1,722 missing in action.
Cambridge American Cemetery, Cambridge, United Kingdom. 3,812 American, airmen, soldiers and sailors buried. 5,127 missing in action.
Cambridge American Cemetery, Cambridge, United Kingdom. 3,812 American airmen, soldiers and sailors buried. 5,127 missing in action.

When you go home, tell them of us and say,
For your tomorrows these gave their today.

—John Maxwell Edmonds, 1944

Pointe du Hoc Ranger Monument. (American Battle Monuments Commission)

© 2018, Bryan R. Swopes

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18 thoughts on “6 June 1944

  1. Proud Daughter of a veteran of Normandy, Battle of the Bulge, liberation of a death camp, and the Korean conflict.

  2. Well done.

    The staggering information contained in these beautiful photographs demonstrate the immensity of the sacrifice and of the selfless grace of these individuals.

  3. To remember, June 6, 1944.
    Thank you for this wonderful post Bryan….. I never forget!

    Although Europe was the beginning of the end, it all started with destroying the Nazi’s in North Africa.
    This is an often forgotten cemetery located in Tunis, Algeria, what’s stunning are the number of MIA.
    https://www.abmc.gov/North-Africa

  4. I’ve read a lot of history books. But these photos hit me like no words or numbers could ever do. Thank you.

  5. I’m a Viet Nam Marine Veteran and son of a WWII vet. And this just totally crushes me!
    Thanks Please do not reply

  6. Thank you never seems adequate enough for the sacrifice they all made. God Bless our troops always.

  7. Amazing post Bryan. I had no idea there are so many US cemeteries in Europe. Thank you for this moving presentation of the staggering sacrifice of American youth that saved the world from the evil of Nazism.

  8. I knew there were a lot of dead soldiers over there. But I never knew there were that many cemeteries dedicated to Allied soldiers in so many different places. Amazing.

  9. I’ve been to the cemetery at Margraten, The Netherlands. I was stationed at NATO Airbase Geilenkirchen on the German border, only a few kilometers away. It was very sobering, very calm, and very well-kept. One of the first graves I saw walking in was a young soldier who was killed on 8 May 1945. I remember thinking how sad it was to make it to the end of his war, only to die on the last day.

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